Every horse remembered

Eight million horses, donkeys and mules died in World War I from shellfire and gas attacks, freezing mud, exhaustion, and mud-borne and respiratory diseases.

Our year-long campaign has now ended

Since November 2017 we’ve been raising awareness for the millions of horses, donkeys and mules who died in the First World War as 2018 marked the centenary of the end of WW1.

We’ve been overwhelmed by the support we’ve received from our supporters for the campaign, so we want to take this opportunity to say thank you.

The campaign started with the launch of our bespoke pin badge (which you can still purchase from Brooke Shop) and the announcement of our Every Horse Remembered ambassadors Harry Meade, Alice Oppenheimer, Laura Renwick, Hannah Russell and Little Alf the miniature Shetland, as well as US Instagram sensation Muledragger. 

Our supporters have also gone above and beyond to support the campaign - attending events and donating to our Every Horse Remembered fundraisers. Many headed out with their horses to honour the fallen equines on #HackToRemember Day back in July to mark the anniversary of the Battle of the Somme. 

The campaign came to a climax in November 2018 as our supporters around the world honoured the fallen equines and soldiers of WW1. From paying their respects by sending a message for the Brooke wreath, which was laid at the Animals in War Memorial Service, to heading out to their local cenotaphs with their horses, we were so moved to see the fallen equines of the First World War honoured in the way they deserve. 

Now we look forward. Our founder Dorothy Brooke started this charity to help the thousands of war horses who had been abandoned in Egypt after the War and sold into a life of hard labour, and today we carry on her legacy to help the millions of working horses, donkeys and mules around the world. 

Thank you again to everyone who supported the campaign!

What is Every Horse Remembered?

Every Horse Remembered marks 100 years since the end of the First World War, when surviving war horses began the next and, for most, the last painful chapter in their lives.

When our founder Dorothy Brooke went searching for these forgotten heroes, she found walking skeletons working as beasts of burden, their hard labour keeping people in Cairo out of poverty. Supported by the generosity of the British public she was able to establish the Old War Horse Memorial Hospital, where Brooke’s story began. 

Horses at war

  • The UK government purchased horses from Australia, Argentina, USA and Canada.
  • Many horses died on the sea journey from America because a horse cannot vomit and seasickness kills them.
  • Horses on the Western Front were provided masks that were effective against chlorine gas.

Read more facts about WWI horses

celebrities and equestrians support #Everyhorse

Read about the celebrities and well-known equestrians - including Clare Balding and Olympic gold medallists Charlotte Dujardin and Victoria Pendleton - who are supporting #Everyhorse on Twitter.

Today, 100 million equines are working worldwide in punishing environments like the searing heat of brick kilns and coal mines, and treacherous icy rivers and mountains. They help around 600 million people in the developing world work their way out of poverty. 

See also

Four churches in Coverdale, North Yorkshire, joined to host the open-air War Horse Remembrance Service.