National Donkey Welfare Day

National Donkey Welfare Day aims to recognise the contribution donkeys make to the national and rural economy across Kenya.

National Donkey Welfare Day

Two thousand people celebrated the sixth annual National Donkey Welfare Day organised by our funded partner Kenya Network for Dissemination of Agricultural Technologies (KENDAT). 

Donkey owners and users, children from local schools and the general public thronged the event in the capital Nairobi. Seven hundred animals were given health check-ups and treatments and advice on good welfare practices and animal husbandry was also given out. Messages about  donkey welfare were also shared by local artists, comedians and musicians. 

The day culminated in a 2km long procession, watched by fifteen hundred people, made up of donkeys, local community members and a band and singing songs and carrying banners and placards about donkey welfare.

Take a look at photos from the day on Flickr

Measuring the impact

Many donkey owners and users as well as the general public said that National Donkey Welfare Day changed their perceptions and attitudes towards donkeys. Whereas previously they would only be interested in the work donkeys were carrying out, now they will pay closer attention to welfare issues affecting the health of the animals.

One of the animal owners commented, ‘’leo nimejua punda si kazi tu ni mnyama mwenye umuhimu sana’’ or “now I know that donkeys aren’t just about work but are very important animals”.

National Donkey Welfare Day aims to recognise the contribution donkeys make to the national and rural economy across Kenya.

Helping working donkeys across Kenya

There are over 1.8 million donkeys in Kenya and around three quarters are working animals used in transport and farming, playing a key role in Kenya’s agricultural economy. 

Around one third of the working donkey population are in a poor condition, suffering from work-related injuries, malnutrition and lameness. Many of the problems arise from a lack of understanding among owners, inadequate resources, as well as the use of traditional practices such as firing.

Find out more about our work in Kenya.

Donkeys from left to right, Delivery, Koigi, Wambui and Mbusi.

Donkeys from left to right, Delivery, Koigi, Wambui and Mbusi. © The Brooke / IMAGEPIX PHOTO AGENCY

Oscar Kimani, aged 14 yeas old, with his donkeys, named Kanise (left) and Kisuve

Oscar Kimani, aged 14 yeas old, with his donkeys, named Kanise (left) and Kisuve. © The Brooke / IMAGEPIX PHOTO AGENCY

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